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Anconeus

Other Terms: Musculus anconeus, Muscle anconé

Muscle parts

None

Latin muscle parts

None

Group

Antebrachial muscle – posterior compartment – lateral group

Etymology

In English, this muscle’s name is the muscle of the elbow. This term has an interesting history. The Old English term ancon was used to refer to the head of the elbow. This was derived from the Greek term agkon meaning “elbow,” which came from the Greek term ankulos meaning “crooked or curved,” referring to the crooked, or curved, look of the proximal end of the ulna.

Origin

Posterior surface of the lateral epicondyle of the humerus

Insertion

Lateral surface of the olecranon and the proximal shaft of the ulna

Action

Extends the elbow – assists the triceps brachii with extension of the elbow. Probably aids in pronation of the antebrachium by abducting the ulna during the pronation movement. It has been postulated that this is necessary for smooth pronation of the forearm around the middle finger, without medial translation. However, studies show it to be equally active during supination, which would negate it as an abductor of the ulna. It more likely functions as an important elbow stabilizer, with the medial head of the triceps, during supination and pronation.

Nerve supply

Radial nerve (C7, C8, and T1)

Blood supply

Interosseous recurrent branch of the posterior interosseous artery; middle collateral branch of the brachial profunda artery.

Latin

Musculus anconeus

French

Muscle anconé

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